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ACM SIGCHI WWW Human Factors (Open Discussion)

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"ACM SIGCHI WWW Human Factors (Open Discussion)" <[log in to unmask]>
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"William Hudson (ACM)" <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 7 Jun 2006 11:03:25 -0300
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Juan Lanus <[log in to unmask]>
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Juan Lanus <[log in to unmask]>
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Recently Microsoft had some trouble when a small company, under attack
by MS for using a name similar to Windows, instead of ducking,
cuestioned the fact that a natural language word like "Windows" were
registered.
They said that under the US laws it's not permitted to register common
English words. The small company was "Lindows".

Lindows changed it's name but MS payed 20 millions to them. It didn't
look as a MS clear victory over trademark abuse. For me it was clear
that MS didn't have a strong point. You might want to see:
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/182805_msftlindows20.html

As William points,. this might be something similar.
"Web 2.0" is more a common term than a name created by the owner for
to give it to his product.
I think that registering a name like "O'Reilly Web2.0 Conference" is
allright, like registering "Comdex" or CeBIT".  Also "CHI".
But the law should also protect all the rest of the people from not
being able to use usual terms.
Maybe the law wouldn't let registering English words, and "Web 2.0" is
not an English word, or is it?
The spirit of the law seems to be that words belong th the people.

If the naming of the new conference (I didn't see it) is worded in a
way as to create confussion and make people think they are registering
for another thing, a hoax, then it's OK to stop them.
But as with software and the open move, the more proprietary a company
gets, the lonelier [?] they'll be. At the end it might happen that
O'Reilly end up being the only one using the term, bacause everybody
else was forced to use a different one.
--
Juan Lanus
TECNOSOL
Argentina

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