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phoenixl <[log in to unmask]>
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Date:
Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:00:03 -0700
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Hi,

Suppose you went around asking people two questions:

    1.  Could you become a good psychologist?

    2.  Could you become a good network engineer?

Results from my informal experiment have been that people seem more
likely to think that they could become a good psychologist than a good
network engineer.  Given that the word "good" is vague, why do people
think that it is easier to become a good psychologist than a good
network engineer when the human brain is much more complicated than a
network?  Could these ideas perhaps lead to technical people undervaluing hci /
user interface people because at some level the technical people
feel anyone can do hci / user interface work with not much training?

What do people think?

Scott

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