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Subject:
From:
Isabel Froes <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Isabel Froes <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Tue, 27 Mar 2012 21:22:22 +0200
Content-Type:
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Please note:

For formatting guidelines, please see: *
http://www.uk.sagepub.com/msg/conv.htm#HOWTOSUBMITYOURMANUSCRIPT*



>
> **** Apologies for multiple copies due to cross-posting ****
> **** Please forward to anyone who might be interested ****
>
> Convergence: The international journal of research into new media
> technologies
>
> SPECIAL ISSUE - 2nd CALL FOR PAPERS
>
> *Mobility and mobile media in Brazil*
>
>
>  *Edited by:*
>
> Adriana de Souza e Silva (North Carolina State University)
>
> Isabel Froes (IT University of Copenhagen)
>
>
>  *Important dates:*
>
> Full papers: June 15th, 2012 (8000/9000 words, including references) *in
> English.*
>
>
>
>    -
>
>    Full papers will undergo a double blind-review process;
>    -
>
>    Submissions may be in the form of empirical research studies or
>    theory-building papers;
>    -
>
>    For formatting guidelines, please see: URL
>    -
>
>    Papers must also include:
>     -
>
>       a brief biography of the author(s),
>       -
>
>       250-word abstract, and
>       -
>
>       6 keywords.
>
>
>  *Proposals and inquiries should be sent electronically to Isabel Froes (*
> *[log in to unmask]* <[log in to unmask]>*).*
>
> *Early submissions are greatly appreciated!*
>
>
> By the second decade of the 21st century, mobile phones have
> reached saturation levels in many countries in the world, surpassing the
> number of landlines and personal computers. Although initial scholarly
> interest on the social use of mobile phones focused on Europe, Asia, and
> the United States, the impact of mobile phone on the developing world (or
> Global South) is increasingly evident and perhaps much more profound. For
> many, the mobile device is the first phone, the first internet connection,
> the first TV set, and the first global positioning system.
>
> Among developing nations, Brazil is a key site for studying the social
> dimension of mobile technologies. The country is part of the so-called BRIC
> (Brazil, Russia, India and China), an acronym that refers to
> fast-growing developing economies. Brazil is the fastest growing economy in
> Latin America, and has over 217 million mobile phones, which represents an
> average of 111 working devices per 100 inhabitants. The country has also
> experienced one of the fastest mobile phone growth rates in the world since
> 2005 (averaging 16.6% annually); is the largest mobile phone market in
> Latin America; and is the fifth-largest mobile market in the world in
> absolute numbers, with roughly 217 million subscriptions as of
> September 2011. However, numbers alone reveal little if not analyzed within
> a broader social, cultural, and economic framework. The focus on a
> homogeneous large-scale market leads to overly sanguine perspectives that
> often obscure how socioeconomic diversity causes and reflects mobile phone
> use. As in many developing countries, Brazil has astounding income gaps
> among different sectors of the population, which influence and
> are influenced by technology development and use. For example, the use of
> high-end services such as mobile banking, and location-based services like
> *Foursquare *and *Yelp *is an intrinsic part of the daily mobile
> practices of the high-income population in the country. Conversely, the
> lower-income population in Rio de Janeiro is familiar with the *diretão*—a
> mobile phone that allows users to make clandestine calls to anywhere in the
> world with the use of an illegal sim card. However, Brazil has also been at
> the forefront of an experimental and innovative approach towards new
> technologies, forecasted in cultural events that focus on art, music and
> film festivals dedicated to new and creative uses of mobile technologies,
> such as the Mobilefest and Arte.mov.
>
> Despite this cultural and socio-economic diversity, and the relevance of
> its marketing, the social use and development of mobile phones in Brazil is
> largely under theorized and poorly studied. With the goal of
> contributing to bridge this gap, this special edition invites essays that
> critically investigate the inter-relations among mobile technologies,
> culture, and social development within the Brazilian society.
>
>
>  *Submitted manuscripts are encouraged (but not limited) to focus on:*
>
> (1) History of mobile phones in Brazil. Essays are encouraged to explore
> the development of mobile phones in Brazil, comparing them to the landline
> infrastructure and internet growth within the Latin America socio-economic
> and political framework. Authors may explore the development and use of new
> mobile services, such as the mobile internet, text messaging, mobile apps,
> etc.
>
> (2) Social uses and appropriation of mobile phones. We welcome essays as
> empirical or theoretical studies dealing with the use and appropriation of
> technology by low-income communities. Of special interest are essays that
> explore how mobile and wireless technologies reconfigure the life of
> community dwellers and how people find new and unexpected uses for existing
> technologies.
>
> (3) Mobile art and games. We invite essays that investigate mobile phones
> as artistic and gaming interfaces, including essays that explore uses of
> hybrid reality, location-aware and pervasive activities in
> educational contexts, media arts, and gaming.
>
> (4) Location-based services. Submitted essays should investigate the uses
> and development of location-based services in Brazil, such as mobile
> annotation, location-based social networks, and mobile mapping.
>
>
> *About the editors:*
>
> Adriana de Souza e Silva is Associate Professor at the Department of
> Communication at North Carolina State University (NCSU), affiliated faculty
> at the Digital Games Research Center, and Interim Associate Director of the
> Communication, Rhetoric and Digital Media (CRDM) program at NCSU.Dr. de
> Souza e Silva's research focuses on how mobile and locative interfaces
> shape people's interactions with public spaces and create new forms of
> sociability. She teaches classes on mobile technologies, location-based
> games and internet studies. Dr. de Souza e Silva is the co-editor (with
> Daniel M. Sutko) of Digital Cityscapes—Merging digital and urban
> playspaces (Peter Lang, 2009), the co-author (with Eric Gordon) of the
> book Net-Locality: Why location matters in a networked
> world (Blackwell, 2011), and the co-author (with Jordan Frith) of Mobile
> interfaces in public spaces: Control, privacy, and
> urban sociability (Routledge, 2012).
>
> Isabel Fróes has received her Masters degree from the
> Interactive Telecommunications Programme at New York University (NYU) and a
> Bachelor’s degree in psychology from Pontifícia Universidade Católica, Rio
> de Janeiro, PUC-RJ in Brazil. She is a lecturer at the IT University of
> Copenhagen (Denmark), where she works both as a practitioner and scholar in
> the fields of communication, mobility, art and design. With a focus towards
> valuable interactions between people and technology, her research analyzes
> the future implications and current uses of digital media. In her courses
> she taps into the value of interactive elements in every arena and explores
> how they could affect the ways new concepts and activities are developed in
> distinct fields. She has presented some of these thoughts at various
> events such as the AAM conference (2009), and the IXDA South America
> (2010,2011). She has taught various courses at Danish institutions such as
> IT University of Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen and Kolding School of
> Design as well as Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Querétaro in Mexico.
>
>
>  *Proposals and inquiries should be sent electronically to Isabel Froes (*
> *[log in to unmask]* <[log in to unmask]>*).*
>
>
>  ________________________
>
> Adriana de Souza e Silva, Ph.D
>
> Associate Professor of Communication
>
> Interim Associate Director, Communication, Rhetoric, & Digital Media Ph.D
> program
>
> North Carolina State University
>
> *http://www.souzaesilva.com* <http://www.souzaesilva.com/>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Isabel Froes
>
> Adjunkt Professor/Ekstern Lektor
> Masters i it, Interaktionsdesign og Multimedier (INM)
> IT University of Copenhagen
> Rued Langgaards Vej 7
> DK-2300 Copenhagen S
> Denmark
>
> http://www.itu.dk/
>
>
>


-- 

Isabel Froes

Adjunkt Professor/Ekstern Lektor
Masters i it, Interaktionsdesign og Multimedier (INM)
IT University of Copenhagen
Rued Langgaards Vej 7
DK-2300 Copenhagen S
Denmark

http://www.itu.dk/

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