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ACM SIGCHI WWW Human Factors (Open Discussion)

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"ACM SIGCHI WWW Human Factors (Open Discussion)" <[log in to unmask]>
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From:
"Gill, Kathy" <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 11 Nov 1998 09:53:28 -0800
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1.0
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Brigitte Eaton <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:
"Gill, Kathy" <[log in to unmask]>
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> From:         Brigitte Eaton[SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
>
> i've seen at least 3 discussions on different newsgroups about whether or
> not to use standard links. it usually comes down to designers saying "it's
> ok to change the colors to match the design, people understand underlined
> links" and usability people saying that it's important to keep standard
> colors. but no one seems to have any proof of this, and if i make a case
> to
> my boss, i'd like to have facts backing me up.
>
>
How many "designers" referenced above have also designed GUIs for software
applications?

Standardization is the key for any GUI. Actually for any design -- think
page numbers, index locations, TOCs, etc. in print media.

Default link colors provide the visual clues "not visited and visited" --
when designers alter this scheme, they introduce uncertainty. Plain and
simple. Like sticking your page numbers in the middle vertically and along
the inside gutter. Yeah you can do it and it might *look* cool -- but who
will be able to thumb thru and find the page number?

It's not just the "underline" it is the feedback that the color changes
provide.


Kathy

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