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Sender: "ACM SIGCHI WWW Human Factors (Open Discussion)" <[log in to unmask]>
X-To: Nancy Brigham <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Fri, 20 Aug 2010 13:55:43 +0800
Reply-To: Chi Zhang <[log in to unmask]>
From: Chi Zhang <[log in to unmask]>
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hi nancy

I am a intern in WWW.BAIDU.COM of China, and we have some interesting
information about the auto-rotating content banners.

Just look at TIEBA.BAIDU.COM, you can see the auto-rotating content banners
on the top-left, we find such banners contribute very large number of pv in
this index page, but the numerical switch button other than the first one
didn't get much pv, that indicates the banner's rotating speed matters most
to the effect of the banner.

Hope others to respond~





2010/8/20 Nancy Brigham <[log in to unmask]>

> I don't have any research to offer, but I do share your concern. That's why
> I design such banners with info that is inspiring rather than essential to
> the content. And I use cookies so that each time the user visits, he or she
> sees a different version of the banner.  This is especially helpful on a
> site that doesn't update very frequently.
>
> I hope others respond to this thread.
> Nancy
>
> Adam Guasch-Melendez wrote:
>
>> Has anyone done any research - or come across any - on auto-rotating
>> content
>> banners? I don't mean ad banners, I mean sites such as the White House (
>> http://www.whitehouse.gov/) and the many US government sites that
>> replicate
>> the feature (http://www.state.gov/ or http://www.nps.gov/). Generally,
>> it's
>> a large banner with a strong graphic image and a short header or
>> descriptive
>> text that links to a secondary page; the banner rotates through four or
>> more
>> options, and also allows users to click through the options.
>>
>> Although the sites that use this feature clearly intend to attract
>> attention
>> to each of the rotating elements, I think it's also possible that if the
>> initial topic doesn't grab the user's attention, a casual user scanning
>> the
>> page may simply read - and scroll - past the banner on to the rest of the
>> page rather than waiting for the rotation or clicking through, so that
>> items
>> intended to be "featured" are never seen at all. I'm not comfortable with
>> relying on users' willingness to break their browsing habits (scanning, in
>> this case). But that's just speculation, and I'd love to see research. Can
>> anyone point me in the right direction?
>>
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