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Subject:
From:
Michael Fry <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Michael Fry <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Thu, 25 Feb 1999 19:09:40 -0500
Content-Type:
TEXT/PLAIN
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TEXT/PLAIN (41 lines)
Somebody brought this up recently, and my recollection (as well as my
opinion) is that users would probably have an easier time with forms if
the 'submit' button did, in fact, use language relevant to the task being
performed. Then there's no mistaking what the action of pressing the
button will do.

That's the theory, anyway. ;)

mf

On Thu, 25 Feb 1999, Pete McNally wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I have noticed that many forms on the web have a "Submit" button to send
> the contents of the form back to the server.  The word submit seems to go
> against the usability requirement of speaking the users' language.  My
> impression is that this words seems to be very techie and probably
> originated from the back-end folks.
>
> For example, if the user is completing a registration application; the
> button should probably say something like "Send Application" or "Register"
>
> What do others think about using the word "Submit"?  I am working on a site
> where some the users' web experience will be minimal, so I have
> reservations against using Submit on buttons.   On the other hand, Submit
> seems almost  becoming a "web standard" just because it is used on many
> sites?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Pete
>
> Pete McNally
> CSC Onward
> Natick, MA USA
> [log in to unmask]
>

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