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Subject:
From:
Kumiyo Nakakoji <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Kumiyo Nakakoji <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 17 Jan 2001 02:51:29 +0900
Content-Type:
text/plain
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CALL for POSITION PAPERS

TITLE:
Tools, Conceptual Frameworks, and Empirical Studies for
Early Stages of Design (CHI2001 Workshop)

http://ccc.aist-nara.ac.jp/CHI2001-WS-on-Design/

ORGANIZERS:
   Kumiyo Nakakoji (SRA/NAIST)
   Mark Gross (U. of Washington)
   Linda Candy (Loughborough Univ.)
   Ernest Edmonds (Loughborough Univ.)

POSITION PAPER DUE: January 26th (Fri), 2001.

OVERVIEW

The early stages of design - in any domain - are cognitively
intensive, and not clearly structured as what we think of as
"problem-solving" activities. The tasks involved in early
stages of design are often characterized by nebulous
thoughts, trial-and-error, exploration, ambiguity, and
imprecision. In the early stages designers employ metaphors,
allow ideas to remain open, and identify requirements and
frame a problem.

Although design has been an abiding interest in the CHI
community, we lack a firm understanding of these cognitive
modes, the processes of early design, and the types of
computational support they  imply. This workshop aims to
address this lack, by bringing together practicing designers
from  diverse domains, cognitive scientists and HCI
researchers who study designing, and system builders who
construct tools for early stages of design.

External representations are one focus of the workshop. In
many domains, sketching, diagramming, and free arrangement
of physical components play an important role in early stage
design. What are  the cognitive and technical
characteristics of these external representations that make
them  useful for early design, and how can we take advantage
of this in computationally enhanced design environments?

Participants are asked to prepare a 20-minute presentation
or demonstration of a technique, an empirical study, or a
computing tool or a system pertaining to the early stages of
design tasks.  Following these presentations, we will
discuss and reflect on the commonalties and differences
among the approaches, and begin to develop a framework for
comparison.

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

Please send a position paper, 4 page maximum, to Kumiyo
Nakakoji, at [log in to unmask], by January 26th, as
a plain text, PDF, Word, or Framemaker file.

The position paper should include a short biography, your
area of interest, and a brief overview of what you would
like to present at the workshop. Criteria for selection will
include the relevance to the workshop and originality of the
work.

We will notify accepted participants by February 2, 2001.

For Questions, please contact:
Kumiyo Nakakoji

Graduate School of Information Science
Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST)
8916-5 Takayama
Ikoma-city, Nara, 630-0101, JAPAN
tel: +81 743-72-5381; fax:  +81 743-72-5383
email: [log in to unmask]
url: http://ccc.aist-nara.ac.jp/~kumiyo/

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