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Subject:
From:
Loren Phillips <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Loren Phillips <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Tue, 2 Jan 2001 07:38:36 -0500
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RE:  Amazon shipping popup
> Would you have not seen the warning if it was on the page, say in
> red and in
> a huge font?


I could easily have not noticed a warning on the page because I rarely read
the home page of the site, since I use it so much.   I believe, as I said,
that there are very rare occassions when I think a message is of critical
importance, and attention absolutely must be drawn to it.  I think Amazon
feels the same way, because I'd never personally seen a popup window on the
site before, and I use their site almost daily.


>Because I can guarantee I wouldn't have seen that popup
>warning-- I am one of those users who can close an unrequested popup window
>faster than it can load.

Believe me, I am too...but Amazon did an EXCELLENT job of making it load
amazingly fast.  I couldn't have closed it faster than it loaded.

Once again, I think an all-out banishment of something because it's usually
done poorly, isn't the best approach.  Instead of saying something is always
"bad" and should never be used, I think a better conversation to be had by
this group is 1) when is an appropriate time to use something, and 2) what
are good, usable examples of when something is done well.   The group, with
some exceptions, has a tendancy to what to see everything in black and
white...to say people should or should not EVER do certain things.  A more
effective approach is to define the grey areas which will always need to be
addressed, and help to define good ways of handling these situations.  I,
for one, ignore any concept of "banning" a technique of any kind.  I may
never have a situation where its use is justified, but I do not believe that
those situations never occur.  The examples I see on this mailing list of
how to IMPROVE techniques, rather than dismiss them, are useful to me,
whether or not I ever have the need to implement them in the future.


-Loren

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