CHI-RESOURCES Archives

ACM SIGCHI Resources (Mailing List)

CHI-RESOURCES@LISTSERV.ACM.ORG

Options: Use Forum View

Use Monospaced Font
Show Text Part by Default
Show All Mail Headers

Message: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]
Topic: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]
Author: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]

Print Reply
Subject:
From:
"Lumsden, Joanna (Jo)" <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Lumsden, Joanna (Jo)
Date:
Wed, 4 Sep 2013 21:56:26 +0000
Content-Type:
text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
text/plain (129 lines)
The contents of the latest issue of:

International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI)
Official Publication of the Information Resources Management Association
Volume 5, Issue 3, July - September 2013
Published: Quarterly in Print and Electronically
ISSN: 1942-390x EISSN: 1942-3918
Published by IGI Publishing, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA
www.igi-global.com/ijmhci<http://www.igi-global.com/ijmhci>

Editor-in-Chief: Joanna Lumsden, Aston University, UK


PAPER ONE

Design Games for In-Situ Design

Erik Kristiansen (Department of Communication, Business and IT, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark)

The mobile culture has spawned a host of context-based products, like location-based and tag-based applications. This presents a new challenge for the designer. There is a need of design methods that acknowledge the context and allows it to influence the design ideas. This article focuses on a design problem where an in-situ design practice may further the early design process: the case of designing a pervasive game. Pervasive games are computer games, played using the city as a game board and often using mobile phones with GPS. Some contextual design methods exist, but the author proposes an approach that calls for the designer to conceptualise and perform ideas in-situ, that is on the site, where the game is supposed to be played. The problem was to design a creativity method that incorporated in-situ design work and which generated game concepts for pervasive games. The proposed design method, called sitestorming, is based on a game using Situationistic individual exploration of the site and different types of game cards, followed by a joint evaluation of the generated ideas. A series of evaluations showed that the designers found the method enjoyable to use, that the method motivated idea generation, and that using in-situ design influenced their design ideas.


To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/article/design-games-for-in-situ-design/81284

To view a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=81284


PAPER TWO

MagiThings: Gestural Interaction with Mobile Devices Based on Using Embedded Compass (Magnetic Field) Sensor

Hamed Ketabdar (Telekom Innovation Labs, Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, TU Berlin, Berlin, Germany), Amin Haji-Abolhassani (Centre for Intelligent Machines, McGill University, Montreal, Canada) and Mehran Roshandel (Telekom Innovation Labs, Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, Berlin, Germany)

The theory of around device interaction (ADI) has recently gained a lot of attention in the field of human computer interaction (HCI). As an alternative to the classic data entry methods, such as keypads and touch screens interaction, ADI proposes a touchless user interface that extends beyond the peripheral area of a device. In this paper, the authors propose a new approach for around mobile device interaction based on magnetic field. Our new approach, which we call it "MagiThings", takes the advantage of digital compass (a magnetometer) embedded in new generation of mobile devices such as Apple's iPhone 3GS/4G, and Google's Nexus. The user movements of a properly shaped magnet around the device deform the original magnetic field. The magnet is taken or worn around the fingers. The changes made in the magnetic field pattern around the device constitute a new way of interacting with the device. Thus, the magnetic field encompassing the device plays the role of a communication channel and encodes the hand/finger movement patterns into temporal changes sensed by the compass sensor. The mobile device samples momentary status of the field. The field changes, caused by hand (finger) gesture, is used as a basis for sending interaction commands to the device. The pattern of change is matched against pre-recorded templates or trained models to recognize a gesture. The proposed methodology has been successfully tested for a variety of applications such as interaction with user interface of a mobile device, character (digit) entry, user authentication, gaming, and touchless mobile music synthesis. The experimental results show high accuracy in recognizing simple or complex gestures in a wide range of applications. The proposed method provides a practical and simple framework for touchless interaction with mobile devices relying only on an internally embedded sensor and a magnet.

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/article/magithings/81285

To view a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=81285


PAPER THREE

Escape-Keyboard: A Sight-Free One-Handed Text Entry Method for Mobile Touch-screen Devices

Nikola Banovic (Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada), Koji Yatani (HCI Group, Microsoft Research Asia, Beijing, China) and Khai N. Truong (Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada)

Mobile text entry methods traditionally have been designed with the assumption that users can devote full visual and mental attention on the device, though this is not always possible. The authors present their iterative design and evaluation of Escape-Keyboard, a sight-free text entry method for mobile touch-screen devices. Escape-Keyboard allows the user to type letters with one hand by pressing the thumb on different areas of the screen and performing a flick gesture. The authors then examine the performance of Escape-Keyboard in a study that included 16 sessions in which participants typed in sighted and sight-free conditions. Qualitative results from this study highlight the importance of reducing the mental load with using Escape-Keyboard to improve user performance over time. The authors thus also explore features to mitigate this learnability issue. Finally, the authors investigate the upper bound on the sight-free performance with Escape-Keyboard by performing theoretical analysis of the expert peak performance.


To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/article/escape-keyboard/81286

To view a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=81286

PAPER FOUR

An Evaluation of Older Adults Use of iPads in Eleven UK Care-Homes

Tim Jones (Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK), Daniel Kay (Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK), Penney Upton (Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK) and Dominic Upton (Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK)

The introduction of the iPad and similar form-factor devices (e.g. Samsung Galaxy Tab, Asus Eee Pad and Motorola Xoom) has provided a unique opportunity for older adults to engage with mobile computing devices and platforms. Engagement with 'traditional' computing devices amongst older adults, including arguably mobile devices, such as laptop computers is low due to dexterity issues amongst this population (Hertzum & Hornbaek, 2010). Whilst the iPad removes some of the traditional barriers to computer engagement, new barriers including weight and screen reflection are evident to an older user group. This paper provides an exploratory evaluation of how older adults in 11 UK care-home settings and the staff engaged in their care are using iPads to help improve communication, build physical social networks amongst residents, staff and family members, and map the most frequently used applications by an older population during a six-month pilot period. Results suggest that applications involving information searching for personally related and historical information were most valued by older adults. Further, older adults and care staff alike report mainly positive experiences of iPad use in care settings including the increased opportunities for social interaction and the enhancement of intergenerational communication. Additionally, the barriers to use (e.g. device weight) are often overcome by low-tech adaptations and adjustment when using the device. This paper argues that the portability and adaptive nature of the iPad combined with the increased social interaction afforded by device could increase quality of life in care settings.


To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/article/an-evaluation-of-older-adults-use-of-ipads-in-eleven-uk-care-homes/81287

To view a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=81287

****************************************************
For full copies of the above articles, check for this issue of the International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI) in your institution's library.  This journal is also included in the IGI Global aggregated "InfoSci-Journals" database:  http://www.igi-global.com/EResources/InfoSciJournals.aspx.
*****************************************************
CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJMHCI:

The primary objective of the International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (JMHCI) is to provide comprehensive coverage and understanding of the issues associated with the design, evaluation, and use of mobile technologies. This journal focuses on human-computer interaction related to the innovation and research in the design, evaluation, and use of innovative handheld, mobile, and wearable technologies in order to broaden the overall body of knowledge regarding such issues. IJMHCI also considers issues associated with the social and/or organizational impacts of such technologies.

Coverage of IJMHCI:

Topics to be discussed in this journal include (but are limited to) the following:

Case studies and/or reflections on experience (e.g. descriptions of successful mobile user interfaces, evaluation set-ups, etc.)
Context-aware/context-sensitive mobile application design, evaluation, and use
Design methods/approaches for mobile user interfaces
Ethical implications of mobile evaluations
Field-based evaluations and evaluation techniques
Gestural interaction techniques for mobile technologies
Graphical interaction techniques for mobile technologies
Issues of heterogeneity of mobile device interfaces/interaction
Lab v. field evaluations and evaluation techniques
Lab-based evaluations and evaluation techniques
Mobile advanced training application design, evaluation, and use
Mobile assistive technologies design, evaluation, and use
Mobile commerce application design, evaluation, and use
Mobile HCI lab design/set-up
Mobile healthcare application design, evaluation, and use
Mobile interactive play design, evaluation, and use
Mobile learning application design, evaluation, and use
Mobile technology design, evaluation, and use by special (needs) groups (e.g. elderly, children, and disabled)
Multimodal interaction on mobile technologies
Non-speech audio-based interaction techniques for mobile technologies
Other emerging interaction techniques for mobile technologies
Other related issues that impact the design, evaluation, and use of mobile technologies
Speech-based interaction techniques for mobile technologies
Tactile interaction techniques for mobile technologies
Technology acceptance as it relates to mobile technologies
User aspects of mobile privacy, security, and trust

IGI Global is pleased to offer a special Multi-Year Subscription Loyalty Program. In this program, customers who subscribe to one or more journals for a minimum of two years will qualify for secure subscription pricing. IGI Global pledges to cap their annual price increase at 5%, which guarantees that the subscription rates for these customers will not increase by more than 5% annually.

Interested authors should consult the journal's manuscript submission guidelines at
www.igi-global.com/ijmhci<http://www.igi-global.com/ijmhci>.

All inquiries and submissions should be sent to:
Editor-in-Chief: Joanna Lumsden at [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>


    ---------------------------------------------------------------
                To unsubscribe, send an empty email to
       mailto:[log in to unmask]
    For further details of CHI lists see http://listserv.acm.org
    ---------------------------------------------------------------

ATOM RSS1 RSS2