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"ACM SIGCHI General Interest Announcements (Mailing List)" <[log in to unmask]>
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Date:
Wed, 1 Aug 2001 13:56:52 -0500
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Mike Byrne <[log in to unmask]>
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Mike Byrne <[log in to unmask]>
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This was posted here back in February, but the deadline is
approaching and Wayne and I thought a reminder might be in order.
My apologies to those of you getting this twice.

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Call for Participation
SPECIAL ISSUE of the Human Factors journal:

Quantitative Formal Models of Human Performance

CO-EDITORS: Michael D. Byrne & Wayne D. Gray

One of the goals of research in Human Factors is the prediction of
human performance. While verbal theories and empirical results
clearly add to the science, they are not especially useful for
quantitative performance prediction. Formal models, on the other
hand, can be used to make specific quantitative predictions about
human performance.

This special issue is intended to examine the use of quantitative
formal models in understanding and predicting human performance
in a human factors context. "Formal models" are construed to
include both computational and mathematical models, and "human
performance" is construed widely to encompass the full range of
human performance including cognition, perception, and motor
control, as well as physical aspects of performance such as
biomechanics and anthropometrics. We are especially interested in
models that span a broad range of performance, for example, those
including vision, cognition, and manual control.

In addition, we explicitly acknowledge that human performance
does not exist in a vacuum-it is a function of the tasks
undertaken, artifacts used to perform the task, and environments
in which it occurs. Thus, we invite submissions that include
formal models of the task, artifact, or environment. Models or
modeling frameworks that jointly consider the human element, the
task, and the artifacts/environment should be of special interest
to the human factors community.

DEADLINE: 1 October 2001

SEND FIVE (5) COPIES OF YOUR MANUSCRIPT TO:
    Editor, Human Factors
    Attention: Special Issue Models of Human Performance
    Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
    P. O. Box 1369, Santa Monica, CA 90406-1369 USA

FOR QUESTIONS OR QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT THE SPECIAL ISSUE
CO-EDITORS AT:

[log in to unmask] (Mike Byrne)
[log in to unmask] (Wayne Gray)

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===========================================================
Mike Byrne, Ph.D.                             [log in to unmask]
Assistant Professor, Psychology Department
Rice University, MS-25          http://chil.rice.edu/byrne/
6100 Main Street                      +1 713-348-3770 voice
Houston, TX  77005-1892                 +1 713-348-5221 fax

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