CHI-ANNOUNCEMENTS Archives

ACM SIGCHI General Interest Announcements (Mailing List)

CHI-ANNOUNCEMENTS@LISTSERV.ACM.ORG

Options: Use Forum View

Use Monospaced Font
Show Text Part by Default
Show All Mail Headers

Message: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]
Topic: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]
Author: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]

Print Reply
Subject:
From:
Terry Winograd <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Terry Winograd <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 5 May 1999 14:16:28 -0700
Content-Type:
text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
text/plain (31 lines)
On April 27, 1999, Dr. Mark Weiser, Chief Technologist at the Xerox Palo Alto
Research Center, passed away after a brief battle with cancer.

Dr. Weiser was world-renowned as an innovative computer scientist, with a
unique vision of the future. He has often been described as the father of
"ubiquitous computing," a term he coined in 1988 to describe a time when
invisible computers will be embedded in every day objects.

A public service will be planned for later this summer. The family has asked
that in lieu of flowers donations be made to a fund that will provide tuition
scholarships to promising Computer Science undergraduates at the University of
California, Berkeley. Individuals who wish to contribute to the Mark D. Weiser
Excellence in Computing Scholarship Fund may send checks to: Berkeley
Engineering Fund, University of California, Berkeley, 201 McLaughlin Hall,
#1722, Berkeley, CA 94720-1722. Please write in the left-hand corner of the
check the designation of the gift -- "Mark D. Weiser Excellence in Computing
Scholarship Fund." Gifts to the fund may also be made by credit card or by
contributing securities.

Gifts can be initiated by email through [log in to unmask]

The Stanford Silicon Valley Archives has set up a site memorializing Mark
Weiser, his ideas and his contributions to the information revolution, at
http://www-sul.stanford.edu/weiser

They plan to keep the site going for an extended period, and all of its
contents will be placed as a permanent record in the Stanford Silicon Valley
Archives, most probably in a permanent,  net-accessible form.
If you have relevant material, please send it to Alex Pang
([log in to unmask]).

ATOM RSS1 RSS2