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From:
Christopher Lueg <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Christopher Lueg <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 29 Apr 2013 16:08:17 +1000
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"What Actually is Interaction? When Does it Start and Where Does It End?"
(http://www.onnai.com/workshops/cc2013_workshop_interaction/)

A workshop at ACM Creativity & Cognition 2013
(http://cc13.creativityandcognition.com/)

Sydney, Australia on 17 June 2013 (Monday)

--Organisers--
Kirsty Boyle, Creative Robotics Laboratory, University of New South
Wales, Australia
Christopher Lueg, Computing & Information Systems, University of
Tasmania, Australia

--Confirmed Keynote speakers--
Professor Catherine Stevens
Research Program Leader of Music Cognition and Action at the MARCS
Institute, University of Western Sydney
Associate Professor Mari Velonaki
Director of the Creative Robotics Lab, at the National Institute of
Experimental Arts, University of New South Wales.

--Workshop topic--
Interaction is being explored from a range of different perspectives,
including a renewed interest in embodied cognition. There are
cognitive and embodied aspects to any kind of interaction but
depending on the disciplinary background, interaction may mean very
different things to different people. In this workshop we are
interested in sharing conceptualisations of interaction across
disciplinary boundaries (eg human computer interaction, information
science, cognitive science, biology, visual and performing arts, fine
arts, robotics) and learning from each other as to how to value and
e-value-ate "interaction". By examining situated cognition and
embodiment theory in practice, we hope to identify key issues and
provide a roadmap for future research which crosses disciplinary
boundaries.

In this workshop we are interested in sharing conceptualisations of
interaction across disciplinary boundaries (eg human computer
interaction, information science, cognitive science, biology, visual
and performing arts, fine arts, robotics) and learning from each other
as to how to assess and evaluate "interaction". By examining situated
cognition and embodiment theory in practice, we hope to identify key
issues and provide a roadmap for future research which crosses
disciplinary boundaries.

--Call for submissions--

We ask prospective participants to submit a 4-page position paper
addressing a topic relevant to the theme of the workshop and/or a
2-page personal statement describing their research, current
interests, questions as relevant to the workshop. Personal statements
should be used to explain the potential relevance of the participant's
work for the workshop, what they can offer and the relevance of the
workshop for their work.

Submitted papers will be selected on the basis of their relevance,
quality and ability to stimulate discussion. Upon request we will
organize peer-reviewing of full written papers. The organisers will
explore options for publishing the papers in a journal special issue.
All submissions should be sent directly to the organisers
([log in to unmask]) in PDF format using the SIGCHI template
files located at http://www.sigchi.org/publications/chipubform.

--Important Dates--

10 May 2013 (extended) – Paper submission deadline
17 May 2013 – Notification of acceptance
24 May 2013 – Camera ready submission
17 June 2013 – Workshop in Sydney

--Venue--

The workshop will take place within the
Creative Robotics Laboratory
National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA) University of New
South Wales (COFA)
Cnr of Oxford St and Greens Rd
Paddington, NSW 2021.

--Workshop Program – 17 June 2013--

The full-day program consists of two parts.
In the morning invited Keynote presentations will focus on discussing
theoretical aspects of embodiment, behavior and perception, and what
it means for interaction. What actually is "interaction" and when do
we call it interaction?

In the afternoon we will focus on putting the insights into practice
by discussing examples provided by participants. "Setting the stage"
will be followed by 5- 10 min presentations by attendees. The focus is
on making people think, not on 'formal' paper presentations.
Participants are explicitly encouraged to bring props that can be used
to illustrate a point.

--Organizers--

Kirsty Boyle uses her training in puppetry, performance and
mechatronics engineering to explore the cultural and societal aspects
of robotics. Her work tree ceremony 2010 is an intricate automata doll
performance featuring the kimono clad robot Suki. This work
incorporates advanced Artificial Intelligence techniques with
traditional automata craft practice which draws upon Boyle’s
comprehensive knowledge of Japanese mechanical doll making known as
Karakuri Ningyo. Since 2002, Boyle has studied with Mr Tamaya Shobei,
a ninth generation Karakuri Ningyo craftsman and last remaining
mechanical doll Master in Japan. Boyle is currently his only student
and the only woman to have ever been trained in the tradition.

tree ceremony was commissioned by the Tinguely Museum, Switzerland and
the Kunsthaus Graz, Austria, for the touring ‘Robot Dreams’ exhibition
2010-11 and awarded "Highly Commended" in the Australian National New
Media Art Award 2012.

Christopher Lueg is a Professor of Computing at the University of
Tasmania (Australia) where he convenes the Information and Interaction
(i2) research group. In 2009-2012 he was appointed Honorary Research
Fellow at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) and in 2009-2010
he served as an Interim Director for HITLab Australia. Lueg is
teaching and researching in human-computer interaction, interaction
design, and ubiquitous computing. An area of long standing interest is
embodiment, cognition and perception, and how this is reflected in
studies of human behavior including wayfinding and information
behavior. In this line of work Dr Lueg has examined the "problem
solving" assumption frequently found in the information behavior
literature and, more recently, how perception mediates the amount of
information available to information seekers.


--
Dr. Christopher Lueg
Professor of Computing
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 100, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
http://www.realworldmatters.net
http://www.cis.utas.edu.au/users/clueg/
CRICOS Provider Code: 00586B

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