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Subject:
From:
"Lumsden, Jo" <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Lumsden, Jo
Date:
Thu, 16 Oct 2008 10:58:22 -0400
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As Editor-in-Chief of the new International Journal of Mobile Human
Computer Interaction (IJMHCI), I am very pleased to announce the release
of the inaugural issue.  Please see below for a detailed description of
the contents of this issue, as well as information on how to obtain
copies of the journal/articles and on how submit to the journal.

Dr. Joanna Lumsden
Editor-in-Chief
International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction
E-mail: [log in to unmask] 
www.igi-global.com/IJMHCI

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The contents of the latest issue of:

International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI)
Official Publication of the Information Resources Management Association
Volume 1, Issue 1, January-March 2009
Published: Quarterly in Print and Electronically
ISSN: 1942-390x EISSN: 1942-3918
Published by IGI Publishing, Hershey-New York, USA
www.igi-global.com/ijmhci
 
Editor-in-Chief: Joanna Lumsden, National Research Council of Canada,
Canada
 
PAPER ONE: 
 
Instrumented Usability Analysis for Mobile Devices
 
Andrew Crossan, University of Glasgow, Scotland
Roderick Murray-Smith, University of Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton
Institute, National University of Ireland - Maynooth, Ireland
Stephen Brewster, University of Glasgow, Scotland
Bojan Musizza, Institut Jozef Stefan, Slovenia
 
This article discusses how instrumented usability analysis involves the
use of sensors during a usability study which provide observations from
which the evaluator can infer details of the context of use, specific
activities or disturbances. This is particularly useful for the
evaluation of mobile and wearable devices, which are currently difficult
to test realistically without constraining users in unnatural ways. To
illustrate the benefits of such an approach, the authors present a study
of touch-screen selection of on-screen targets, whilst walking and
sitting, using a PocketPC instrumented with an accelerometer. From the
accelerometer data the user's gait behaviour is inferred, allowing us to
link performance to gait phase angle, showing there were phase regions
with significantly lower error and variability. The article provides
examples of how information acquired via sensors gives us quantitatively
measurable information about the detailed interactions taking place when
mobile, allowing designers to test and revise design decisions, based on
realistic user activity.
 
To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/articles/details.asp?id=32949
 
PAPER TWO: 
 
Appropriating Heuristic Evaluation for Mobile Computing
 
E. Bertini, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
T. Catarci, University of Rome "La Sapienza,"  Italy
A. Dix, Lancaster University, UK
S. Gabrielli, University of Udine, Italy
S. Kimani, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya
G. Santucci, University of Rome "La Sapienza,"  Italy
 
This article describes a modified collection of usability heuristics
that are designed to be appropriate for evaluation in mobile computing.
Heuristic evaluation has proven popular for desktop and web interfaces,
both in practical design and as a research topic. Compared to full user
studies, heuristic evaluation can be highly cost-effective, allowing a
large proportion of usability flaws to be detected ahead of full
development with limited resource investment. Mobile computing shares
many usability issues with more conventional interfaces. However, it
also poses particular problems for usability evaluation related to
aspects such as limited screen real estate, intermittent user attention,
and contextual factors. 
 
To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/articles/details.asp?id=32950
 
PAPER THREE: 
 
Pickup Usability Dominates:  A Brief History of Mobile Text Entry
Research and Adoption
 
Mark David Dunlop, University of Strathclyde, UK
Michelle Montgomery Masters, University of Strathclyde, UK
 
This article discusses how text entry on mobile devices (e.g. phones and
PDAs) has been a research challenge since devices shrank below laptop
size: mobile devices are simply too small to have a traditional
full-size keyboard. There has been a profusion of research into text
entry techniques for smaller keyboards and touch screens: some of which
have become mainstream, while others have not lived up to early
expectations. As the mobile phone industry moves to mainstream touch
screen interaction we will review the range of input techniques for
mobiles, together with evaluations that have taken place to assess their
validity: from theoretical modelling through to formal usability
experiments. We also report initial results on iPhone text entry speed.
 
To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/articles/details.asp?id=32951
 
PAPER FOUR:
 
On-the-Move and in Your Car: An Overview of HCI Issues for In-Car
Computing
 
G.E. Burnett, University of Nottingham, UK
 
The introduction of computing and communications technologies within
cars raises a range of novel human-computer interaction (HCI) issues. In
particular, it is critical to understand how user-interfaces within cars
can best be designed to account for the severe physical, perceptual and
cognitive constraints placed on users by the driving context. This
article introduces the driving situation and explains the range of
computing systems being introduced within cars and their associated
user-interfaces. The overall human-focused factors that designers must
consider for this technology are raised. Furthermore, the range of
methods (e.g. use of simulators, instrumented vehicles) available to
designers of in-car user-interfaces are compared and contrasted.
Specific guidance for one key system, vehicle navigation, is provided in
a case study discussion. 
 
To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/articles/details.asp?id=32952
 
PAPER FIVE:
 
User Acceptance of Mobile Services
 
Eija Kaasinen, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland
 
This article presents the technology acceptance model and introduces two
case studies of implementing the model as a design and evaluation
framework in practice.  Personal mobile devices are increasingly being
used as platforms for interactive services. Ease of use is important,
but the services should also provide clear value to the user and they
should be trustworthy and easy to adopt. These user acceptance factors
form the core of the Technology Acceptance Model for Mobile Services
introduced in this article. The model has been set up based on field
trials of several mobile services with altogether more than 200 test
users. 
 
To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
http://www.igi-global.com/articles/details.asp?id=32953
 
 
Book Review:
Handbook of Research on User Interface Design and Mobile Evaluation for
Mobile 
Technology
Edited By: Joanna Lumsden
ISBN: 978-1-59904-871-0
Copyright 2008
1240 pages
 
Reviewed by Matt Jones, Swansea University, UK
 
****************************************************
For full copies of the above articles, check for this issue of the
International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI) in
your institution's library.  This journal is also included in the IGI
Global aggregated "InfoSci-Journals" database: www.infosci-journals.com
<http://www.infosci-journals.com/> . If your library is not currently
subscribed to IJMHCI, recommend IJMHCI subscription
http://www.igi-global.com/journals/details.asp?ID=8050&mode=recommend to
your library or "InfoSci-Journals" to your librarian.
*****************************************************

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJMHCI: 

The primary objective of the International Journal of Mobile Human
Computer Interaction (JMHCI) is to provide comprehensive coverage and
understanding of the issues associated with the design, evaluation, and
use of mobile technologies. The journal will focus on human-computer
interaction related innovation and research in the design, evaluation,
and use of innovative handheld, mobile, and wearable technologies in
order to broaden the overall body of knowledge regarding such issues. It
will also consider issues associated with the social and/or
organizational impacts of such technologies.
 
Coverage of IJMHCI:

 The International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction will
focus on human-computer interaction related innovation and research in
the design, evaluation, and use of innovative handheld, mobile, and
wearable technologies in order to broaden the overall body of knowledge
regarding such issues. It will also consider issues associated with the
social and/or organizational impacts of such technologies.

Among topics to be included (but not limited) are the following: 
Non-speech audio-based interaction techniques for mobile technologies 
Speech-based interaction techniques for mobile technologies 
Graphical interaction techniques for mobile technologies 
Gestural interaction techniques for mobile technologies 
Tactile interaction techniques for mobile technologies 
Other emerging interaction techniques for mobile technologies 
Design methods/approaches for mobile user interfaces 
Issues of heterogeneity of mobile device interfaces/interaction 
User interface migration from desktop to mobile technologies 
Mobile commerce application design, evaluation, and use 
Mobile healthcare application design, evaluation, and use 
Mobile learning application design, evaluation, and use 
Mobile advanced training application design, evaluation, and use 
Mobile assistive technologies design, evaluation, and use 
Mobile technology design, evaluation, and use by special (needs) groups
- e.g., elderly, children, disabled 
Mobile interactive play design, evaluation, and use 
Context-aware/context-sensitive mobile application design, evaluation,
and use 
Wearable technology/application and interaction design, evaluation, and
use 
User aspects of mobile privacy, security, and trust 
Technology acceptance as it relates to mobile technologies 
User interface architectures for mobile technologies 
Mobile HCI lab design/set-up 
Lab-based evaluations and evaluation techniques 
Field-based evaluations and evaluation techniques 
Lab v. field evaluations and evaluation techniques 
Ethical implications of mobile evaluations 
Case studies and/or reflections on experience in any of the above - e.g.
descriptions of successful mobile user interfaces, evaluation set-ups,
etc. 
All other related issues that impact the design, evaluation, and use of
mobile technologies.
 
Interested authors should consult the journal's manuscript submission
guidelines at www.igi-global.com/ijmhci.
 
 All inquiries and submissions should be sent to:
Editor-in-Chief: Joanna Lumsden at [log in to unmask]


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