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Subject:
From:
Bebe Barrow <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Bebe Barrow <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 19 Mar 2018 09:27:52 -0700
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I am pleased to announce the latest title in Morgan & Claypool's series on
Human-Centered Informatics:

 

The Art of Interaction: What HCI Can Learn from Interactive Art
Ernest Edmonds, De Montfort University
Paperback ISBN: 9781608458981
eBook ISBN: 9781608458998

Hardcover ISBN: 9781681732855
March 2018, 90 pages
http://www.morganclaypoolpublishers.com/catalog_Orig/product_info.php?produc
ts_id=1219

 

Abstract:

What can Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) learn from art? How can the HCI
research agenda be advanced by looking at art research? How can we improve
creativity support and the amplification of that important human capability?
This book aims to answer these questions. Interactive art has become a
common part of life as a result of the many ways in which the computer and
the Internet have facilitated it. HCI is as important to interactive art as
mixing the colours of paint are to painting. This book reviews recent work
that looks at these issues through art research. In interactive digital art,
the artist is concerned with how the artwork behaves, how the audience
interacts with it, and, ultimately, how participants experience art as well
as their degree of engagement. The values of art are deeply human and
increasingly relevant to HCI as its focus moves from product design towards
social benefits and the support of human creativity. The book examines these
issues and brings together a collection of research results from art
practice that illuminates this significant new and expanding area. In
particular, this work points towards a much-needed critical language that
can be used to describe, compare and frame research in HCI support for
creativity.

Table of Contents: Introduction / A Little HCI History / Learning from
Interactive Art / A Personal History / Case Studies and Lessons /
Conclusion: The Next HCI Vocabulary / Author Biography

 

 

Series: Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics

Editor: John M. Carroll, Penn State University

 
<http://www.morganclaypoolpublishers.com/catalog_Orig/index.php?cPath=22&sor
t=2d&series=30>
http://www.morganclaypoolpublishers.com/catalog_Orig/index.php?cPath=22&sort
=2d&series=30


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