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Subject:
From:
Tom Moran <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Tom Moran <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 10 May 2000 13:03:28 -0700
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Mike Brenner <[log in to unmask]> asks about bindings.

> how could I figure out what bindings I could use and what
> products I would have to buy in order to use it:

   Ask on the internet.  For the specific examples of "light up
dots...", "receive multiple simultaneous keypresses", and "send
email", one answer for Windows is to buy Claw from RR Software.
Also, as with all Windows software development, you'll have to have
Microsoft's copyrighted stuff, either directly from MS or
indirectly bundled with another vendor's product.

>EXPERTS OF A CERTAIN KIND CAN FIND THEM, AND THOSE EXPERTS DO NOT
>SEEM TO EXIST.

  Clearly the developers of such things are experts, who exist.
Perhaps they should be advertising more.  Would you prefer paper in
your mailbox, or e-mail announcements in your e-box?  Of course the
advertising costs will be added to the product cost.

  Perhaps some helpful person will create an e-Bay for Ada
software:  "I need a program to do x", "I have a binding available
to do y".

  There are also two problems due to $0 software:  people often
want software to do x, with the additional requirement that someone
else pay for it.  Extra requirements always restrict the solution
space.  Others, who are creating $0 software, figure that if they
are volunteering their time, they can do things their way.  The too
common result is lots of competing one-man mini ("big enough for
what I wanted") implementations, instead of one or two full size
and fully useful products.

> ADA-95 WOULD BE USED MORE IF I COULD PROGRAM MY GAMES
  Agreed.  But part of the blame has to go to Microsoft, which has
put Windows in control of nearly all computers, and has made
Windows game programming a complex, high-investment activity.

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