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Subject:
From:
Steven Deller <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Steven Deller <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Tue, 14 Apr 1998 02:56:17 -0400
Content-Type:
text/plain
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>Are there
> specific
> references I can cite when I argue for this? (I don't have enough
> authority/stature, and saying "some guy on the internet said so" has
> never
> worked well for me.) Or is this just basic stuff "everybody knows"?

Joel,
A with is a coupling.  Fewer with's means looser coupling.
Loose coupling and strong binding are two principles of good programming
design espoused by numerous sources in the 70's and 80's.  It's too late
for my aged memory to recall the various references, but if no one else
can think of them, maybe I will be able to tomorrow.

Regards,
Steve

On Monday, April 13, 1998 8:33 PM, Joel Seidman
[SMTP:[log in to unmask]] wrote:
> Mail*Link( SMTP               with considered harmful? (was:
> Compilation
> speed dataI
>
> Robert I. Eachus said:
>
> <<I've actually had to convince projects to accept guidelines...
> (More than six withs on a package spec, or fifteen on a package body
> indicates that there is restructuring that should be considered.  There
> are
> good arguments for having more withs on the main program, but a with on
> a
> subunit is almost always an indication of a design problem.) >>
>
>
> I found this very interesting. I've always considered minimizing with's
> a
> good design goal, evidencing good choice of modularity. But I'm sure
> many
> programmers I work with are not aware of the concept you are
advocating.
>
> While most would never (almost never) use a "goto", many would add a
> "with"
> at the drop of a hat if it would "make the program work". Are there
> specific
> references I can cite when I argue for this? (I don't have enough
> authority/stature, and saying "some guy on the internet said so" has
> never
> worked well for me.) Or is this just basic stuff "everybody knows"?
>
> -- Joel

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