Hi, Joyce,

If I read you correctly, you are referring to the idea of "Developing
Windows 2000
Certified Applications," as described in the presentation on Win2K
certification from
Tech-Ed 2000 (see attached URL).  There are about 8,500 applications
certified to
run under Windows 2000, having met the certification criteria and been
awarded
permission to place a logo on their packages by Microsoft.

Are you thinking in terms of certification of a program to be
platform-independent?
That is, after passing a set of criteria, a product is certified to be able
to run
on all platforms in a set and a logo is issued to that effect?

Note that this is not the same as Ada compiler validation, where a compiler
is
awarded a distinction of being compliant with the standard language
definition.

Rick
====================================
Richard Conn, Principal Investigator
Reuse Tapestry


-----Original Message-----
From: Team Ada: Ada Advocacy Issues (83 & 95)
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of Joyce L. Tokar
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 9:31 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Leveraging MicroSoft's Marketing


I recently received a long (7 pages) flyer from MicroSoft expounding upon
the virtues of certifying software.  In their case it is Windows
2000.  It seems to me that there is an opportunity here for the Ada
community to jump onto the certified software band-wagon along
with MicroSoft and raise the awareness of the user community that some tools
are certified and have been for a long time.

Comments?

JLTokar