[said Rush]
>
> It also points out that those who control various organizations or
> modes of communications (editors, webmasters, moderators, elected
> officers, etc.) need to work hard to let other interested parties
> know how their "system works".  It's especially important to provide
> information about: who's in charge & how to get in touch with them,
> and how to become an active partipant.
>
> Rush Kester

That's a very good and constructive suggestion. We should all keep
in mind that everyone in SIGAda (and also ARA, by the way) has a
"day job", and will therefore be more responsive to a _specific_
suggestion, by e-mail to a specific individual. We are not perfect
and have lots on our plates, so we often cannot know something needs
fixing till someone points out - politely - that it's broken.

(Putting the SIGAda by-laws, etc., on the web is an obvious example
of nobody focusing on it before.)

Suggested changes in AdaLetters should go to Marty Carlisle, the SIGada
editor. As it happens, he reads Team-Ada, but that is a coincidence
and we shouldn;t count on it - he, too, has a day job.:-)

Similarly, if you have a general suggestion for the SIGAda website,
send it to John McCormick, the SIGAda webmaster.

If it's specific to the website section on one WG (education, for
example), send it to that WG's chair. Since all these folks' names
and e-mail addresses are pretty prominently given on the site, that's
easy for you to do.

Obviously, SIGAda policy questions are best sent to the officers;
as the present discussion about voting membership indicates, we
are an ACM group and do not completely control our policies, but
still, the SIG officers are the best place to start.

Don't count on _anything_ sent only to this list or c.l.a. being
received by the "right" person! Many people simply do not hang out
on the net.

Mike Feldman