>and/or Engineering (preferably all three), THEN do (at least) a one year
>internship.  I tend to think it would be better if it were 1 1/2 years or
>longer.

I think if there is more than a one year internship we would lose a lot of
candidates, but that might be a good filter in the process.

>>The unanimous response was, "We are graduating professionals not
technicians."
>Well, what can I say.  You were talking to the wrong people.

It was department chairs and several VP of schools.

>>The fact is the individual not the group define the work ethic of a
professional.
>Most professional disciplines have very carefully written codes of
>ethics.  The role of the individual is to apply that code of ethics
>conscientiously, not to write his own.

The "work" ethic I spoke of is not a code of standards and practices, but
rather personal beliefs and principles that dictate the diligence with which
an individual applies to their work to produce a quality product.

>>Ron tends to paint his pictures with a "very" broad brush,
>I hope you now see a little more of the detail.

Agreed!

>By "actual world" I suppose you mean the overwhelming majority of "current
>working environments for software developers".  I haven't a clue what you

You a correct.  Unfortunately, the real world (management) imposes schedules
and expectations that are less than realistic.  I have spent a good deal of
time over the past two years teaching Physics to my project management.  The
primary lesson/the ONLY lesson has been the difference between the physics
of check mark on a schedule and the physics of reality.  I think I got
though once or twice.  We spent a lot of time explaining why a delivery
could not be made.  We this continual explanations and much passive
resistance we have maintained a fairly high quality in our product.