At 02:24 PM 2/23/01 -0500, Colin Paul Gloster wrote:

>Now most degrees I've ever come across (but perhaps especially programming
>and engineering varities) do have internships but maybe my sample space is
>not representative or maybe the degrees you are involved with do have
>internships but you deem to be woefully low. Most of the ones I've come
>across set aside in the order of six months in the penultimate year (third
>year) for industry placements and I know of a couple which set aside nine
>months. I do not know of any with longer timeframes but anyone doing a
>degree of such a nature for the right reasons and with enough competency
>already before even enrolling would be determined and sometimes successful
>enough to work during the 3/4 month holidays in the first two years.
>
>Should internships be at least eighteen months long then you will find
>that so many undergraduates will not return and graduate, preferring to
>stay at work.


I am familiar with many of the current "internship" programs.  They are,
generally speaking, MUCH too short, and they tend not to be very
"directed", though they usually add a considerable amount of valuable
learning experience for the undergraduate.

What I am talking about is a program that comes AFTER completing the
undergraduate degree.  But I am not talking about "yet another Master's
program".  It would be a bona fide real world oriented, in depth training
program in how to do Software Engineering.  Detailed content of the program
would be specific, and successful exit criteria would be rigorous.  The
successful participant would be certified in a way no existing
undergraduate or graduate program I know of could claim.


sro
S. Ron Oliver, semi-retired professor of Computer Science and Computer
Engineering.  www.csc.calpoly.edu/~sroliver

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