Call for Papers: Information Processing & Management special issue on Collaborative Information Seeking

Deadline: May 8, 2009

Guest Editors:
Gene Golovchinsky (FX Palo Alto Laboratory)
Meredith Ringel Morris (Microsoft Research)
Jeremy Pickens (FX Palo Alto Laboratory)

***

Today's digital search technologies are designed for a single user working alone, even though prior studies of students and information workers have demonstrated that information seeking is sometimes a collaborative process. Such collaborations are difficult to achieve with existing digital tools, often resulting in high overhead such as undesired redundancy of effort.

Collaborative information seeking refers to occasions when pairs or groups of people actively work together to satisfy a shared information need. Such collaborations may be synchronous or asynchronous, co-located or remote. Note that collaborative information seeking refers to explicit collaboration among group members; this stands in contrast to techniques such as collaborative filtering, recommender, or personalization systems that use data from large numbers of people in order to enhance a single user's experience; participants in these latter types of systems are not explicitly working together towards a shared goal.

Understanding how digital technologies can improve the process and outcomes of collaborative information seeking is an emerging area of research engaging several communities, including researchers in the fields of information retrieval, library sciences, education, human-computer interaction, and computer-supported cooperative work. In this special issue, we are seeking articles relating to all aspects of digital support for collaborative information seeking, including:

* Articles describing current practices of user groups who may benefit from increased support for collaborative information seeking, emphasizing what designers of digital tools can learn from such current practices.

* Articles describing novel tools that facilitate collaborative information seeking, such as new user interface designs or algorithmic innovations.

* Articles describing evaluations of collaborative information seeking systems, such as lessons learned from observing a system's use or discussion of new evaluation metrics or methodologies relevant to this emerging field.

* Articles proposing theoretical models of collaborative information seeking that account for system organization and/or user behavior.


***

More details regarding the CFP can be found online at http://www.elsevier.com/framework_products/promis_misc/ipmspecialissue.pdf
The Information Processing & Management journal homepage can be found at: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/244/description#description



    ---------------------------------------------------------------
                To unsubscribe, send an empty email to
     mailto:[log in to unmask]
    For further details of CHI lists see http://sigchi.org/listserv
    ---------------------------------------------------------------