I agree with Hal that it's common for encounters such as his to lean heavily
toward the physician, leaving the patient wondering if anyone even remembers
he's there (and that, in fact their goal is to actually treat him). An
interesting article I found about this is the smart patient room:
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08016/849476-53.stm



For the past two years, Noam Tractinsky and I have been researching service
situations like this in terms of what role service providers, customers and
IT systems play in creating service experiences, with the goal of finding
ways to improve them.



Ohad Inbar
http://www.incidentaluser.org



On Mon, Jan 11, 2010 at 9:38 PM, Hal Shubin <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I was talking with my primary care physician today about how
> un-patient-centered my recent hospital stay was. (See below for some
> examples.) He mentioned a seminar or class he teaches for residents about
> empathy and looking at medical care from the patient's point of view. I'm so
> glad he mentioned this because the experience made me want to find a way to
> apply what I know to fix the problem.
>
> I'm sure there's not a lot of medical literature about this. Driving away,
> I started thinking about what there is in *our* literature, and in our
> methodologies that could help him. For example, maybe the idea of personas
> would be useful: they could work together to create personas for Sally
> SeniorCitizen, Andy Appendicitis, Uncle UnknownProblems and Polly Pregnant,
> and refer to them in their discussions.
>
> Some of my consulting work has involved medical software and hardware, and
> I've done usability testing with physicians. But this is different. Have you
> done anything relevant that I could pass along? Or have any ideas that seem
> appropriate?
>
> thanks                          -- hs
>
> A few examples of how un-patient-focused my hospital stay was.
> = I didn't mind having vitals checked every four hours around the clock --
> it seems useful, and I wasn't sleeping well anyway.
> = Nurses would do something and say they'd be back in (say) 20 minutes to
> check on the outcome, but it was much longer than that.
> = Someone came in during the night and started asking questions without
> identifying himself -- how do I answer without knowing who and what he is?
> = Two teams of doctors wanted to poke, probe and interview me when I was
> just too cold and uncomfortable, so I had to ask them to leave. They said
> they'd be back soon, but it was the next day.
> = Another doctor wouldn't tell me what I should order when I was moved to a
> solid diet, he just vetoed all my suggestions; he said he'd come back later
> instead of helping me right then, but he sent a medical student three hours
> later. Etc.
>
>
> - - - - - - - - - -
> Hal Shubin  -  Interaction Design, Inc.
> 617 489 6595  -  www.user.com
>
>    --------------------------------------------------------------
>           Tip of the Day: Postings must be in plain text
>     CHI-WEB: www.sigchi.org/web POSTINGS: mailto:[log in to unmask]
>              MODERATORS: mailto:[log in to unmask]
>       SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & FAQ:  www.sigchi.org/web/faq.html
>    --------------------------------------------------------------
>
>

    --------------------------------------------------------------
    Tip of the Day: Quote only what you need from earlier postings
     CHI-WEB: www.sigchi.org/web POSTINGS: mailto:[log in to unmask]
              MODERATORS: mailto:[log in to unmask]
       SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & FAQ:  www.sigchi.org/web/faq.html
    --------------------------------------------------------------