From: Bob Leif
To: Fellow Readers of Comp.Lang.Ada & Team-Ada
The following comes from www.mvista.com
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About MontaVista Software
June 1999
MontaVista Software Incorporated is dedicated to delivering Open Source
Software solutions for the worldwide embedded software market. Its initial
product offering is Hard Hat(TM) Linux, a standard off-the-shelf binary
distribution of Linux for x86 and PowerPC architectures, tailored for the
needs of embedded software developers. MontaVista's Hard Hat Linux is
answering the need for small memory footprint, guaranteed response, high
availability and other key issues that desktop Linux does not provide. It
currently supports the two most popular microprocessor architectures used in
high-end embedded systems, the Intel x86 family and the Motorola/IBM PowerPC
family. Hard Hat Linux is supported by a comprehensive development tool
suite
including optimizing compilers for C, C++ and other languages including
Java,
high-level-language debuggers and performance monitoring tools. A set of
enhancements are also available including CPU clustering support, parallel
computing support and extensive networking applications. The company also
provides Linux porting and customization services for customers worldwide.
In short, MontaVista is "The Embedded Linux Company."

MontaVista was founded in March 1999 by James F. Ready. It has received a
first round of funding from Alloy Ventures Incorporated of Palo Alto CA.
Alloy Ventures, a well established venture fund with over $300 million under
management, has over 20 years experience in the high tech venture capital
business. In June, 1999, MontaVista announced that Force Computers,
Incorporated and Ziatech Corporation will partner with MontaVista Software
to provide Hard Hat Linux for their CompactPCI customers in
telecommunications and other embedded markets.
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An Ada based Linux would be a much better choice for embedded Linux
(POSIX) applications. It would also be much more profitable than compilers
and would help to sell Ada compilers.