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Was anyone else listening to the speakers at ACM97?  If we're going to have
anything new and interesting in computing by 2047, it's up to us to press our
technology into schools at all levels.  Or, wind up with a bunch of high-tech
solutions that nobody can fix or maintain.

If you've not checked into the results of the conference, you might want to
take a moment and visit one or more of the following URLs:

http://www.vxtreme.com/live/acm97/live.html
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http://www.microsoft.com/corpinfo/adm97.htm
http://www.acm.org/acm97/home.html

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> From: Michael Feldman <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Promoting Ada
> Date: Wednesday, March 19, 1997 12:27 PM
>
> >
> > >... were huge, noisy 286's (the old Zeniths); I can;t
> > >imagine putting 20 of those in a high school lab these days.
>
> >   My son attends what claims to be the best private high
> > school in Silicon Valley.  His CS class uses Turbo-Pascal on
> > 286s.  He's done some games at home using the old Janus Ada
> > 83 compiler targeting the 286s at school but must be careful
> > not to require fast FP or VGA display.  My daughter's school
> > has a bunch of donated SGIs which she tells me are used for
> > web browsing and e-mail.  Education today, sigh.
> >
> Hmmm - probably your son's school just hasn't upgraded in a while.
> Easy to understand, in the budgeting process you fix what's broken,
> and unfortunately those old machines don't break.:-)
>
> That's quite different from dropping a bunch of old machines into
> a school. I'd find it more than a bit insulting. We claim to care
> about education; why should our schoolchildren have to deal with
> hand-me-downs that aren't good enough for the government anymore?
>
> Indeed, if our schoolchildren are going to learn Ada, why shouldn't
> they learn Ada 95?
>
> Mike Feldman